A study has  warned  that the dry-season irrigated rice in West Africa’s Sahel region has reached the critical threshold of 37 degrees Celcius – the tipping point.

It added that further temperature rise could devastate rice yields in the region due to decreasing photosynthesis at high temperatures.

According to the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the Sahel will experience higher average temperatures as well as changes in rainfall patterns over the course of the 21st century. These changes threaten food security and the livelihoods of the region’s predominantly rural population.

“Our model shows that without adaptation, irrigated rice yields in West Africa’s Sahel region in the dry season would decrease by about 45 per cent, but with adaptation, they would decrease significantly less – by about 15 per cent,” explained the lead author Dr Pepijn van Oort, a  Crop Modeler at Africa Rice Centre (AfricaRice).

Oort clarified that it was important to keep in mind that this is a West Africa average, and that there are big differences within West Africa. “Things are better in the cooler coastal regions and a lot worse in the hotter inland sites,” he added.

“Also, more investigation is needed to understand clearly photosynthesis processes at extreme temperatures, as there has been almost no research conducted on rice at such high temperatures,” Dr van Oort cautioned.

In addition, he said there is need to explore further adaptation options, such as shifting sowing dates more into the cold dry season.

Although rice thrives well in hot and warm climates, high temperatures of more than 35 degrees Celcius can damage plant processes and lead to lower yields. Rice is also vulnerable to cold temperatures, which can slow growth.

The study forecasts that in East Africa, rising temperatures will create new opportunities for rice. In East Africa rice is grown mostly in the highlands, which are often too cold for the crop, and this will improve with higher temperatures. Also, rice could benefit from increased CO2.

However, improved water and nutrient management will be needed to have the maximum benefit, the study added.

thenationonlineng

رائس ایکسپورٹرز کا غیرملکی خریداروں کوایوارڈ دینے کا فیصلہ

| رائس ایکسپورٹرز ایسوسی ایشن (ریپ )کے زیر اہتمام 20فروری کو اپنے انٹر نیشنل بائرز (غیر ملکی خریدار وں)کی خدمات کو سراہنے کیلئے انٹر نیشنل بائرز ایوارڈ کی تقریب دبئی میں منعقد ہورہی ہے رائس ایکسپورٹرز ایسوسی ایشن (ریپ )کے زیر اہتمام 20فروری کو اپنے انٹر نیشنل بائرز (غیر ملکی خریدار وں)کی خدمات کو سراہنے کیلئے انٹر نیشنل بائرز ایوارڈ کی تقریب دبئی میں منعقد ہورہی ہے جس میں10عالمی خریداروں کو انکی خدما ت کے عوض گولڈ ٹرافی دی جائے گی جبکہ 30 پاکستانی رائس ایکسپورٹرزکو بھی چاول ایکسپورٹ کر نے کے حوالے سے کارکردگی ایوارڈ دیے جائینگے ،رائس ایکسپورٹرز ایسوسی ایشن (ریپ) کے چیئرمین چوہدری سمیع اﷲ نے اس امر کا اظہار گزشتہ روز ریپ کے آفس میں پریس کانفرنس میں کیا۔

Rice in Pakistan 1993-2017

This statistic show the cultivation area, production per acre and average yield of rice in Pakistan from 1993-2018.

Year

Area/(‘000’hectares)

Sindh

Punjab

Balochistan

KPK

Pakistan

1993-94

702.9

1300.6

120.9

62.7

2187.1

1994-95

598.3

1338.7

124.3

63.3

2124.6

1995-96

642.3

1327.8

128

63.7

2161.8

1996-97

701.8

1354.5

130.1

64.7

2251.1

1997-98

689.3

1409.9

151.3

66.8

2317.3

1998-99

704.1

1492.9

158.4

68.2

2423.6

1999-00

690.4

1609.4

148.5

67.1

2515.4

2000-01

540.1

1627.2

142.9

66.4

2376.6

2001-02

461.1

1475.9

116.5

60.7

2114.2

2002-03

488.3

1512.3

163.6

61

2225.2

2003-04

551.2

1687.9

159.8

61.7

2460.6

2004-05

543.9

1754.3

161.5

59.9

2519.6

2005-06

593.2

1762.4

206.4

59.4

2621.4

2006-07

598.1

1728.4

193.9

60.8

2581.2

2007-08

594

1723.5

136.2

61.7

2515.4

2008-09

733.5

1977.7

190.1

61.3

2962.6

2009-10

707.7

1931.5

190.1

53.8

2883.1

2010-11

361.2

1766.8

191.2

46.1

2365.3

2011-12

 

 

 

 

2571.0

2012-13

 

 

 

 

2309.0

2013-14

 

 

 

 

2789.0

2014-15

 

 

 

 

2891.0

2015-16

 

 

 

 

2748.0

2016-17

 

 

 

 

2724.0

 

Year

Yield kgs/hec

Sindh

Punjab

Balochistan

KPK

Pakistan

1993-94

2781

1221

2756

1888

1826

1994-95

2351

1258

1912

1867

1622

1995-96

2642

1358

2720

1856

1835

1996-97

2795

1376

2735

1909

1912

1997-98

2671

1382

2736

1949

1870

1998-99

2742

1458

2739

1959

1928

1999-00

3075

1542

2844

1925

2050

2000-01

3115

1584

2884

1976

2021

2001-02

2514

1535

2877

2005

1836

2002-03

2662

1706

2857

2159

2013

2003-04

2599

1701

2582

2120

1970

2004-05

2757

1699

2611

2057

1994

2005-06

2901

1804

2563

1978

2116

2006-07

2946

1779

2466

2021

2107

2007-08

3060

1907

2433

2079

2212

2008-09

3459

1842

3386

2091

2347

2009-10

3423

1922

3393

1903

2387

2010-11

3406

1915

683

1701

2039

2011-12

 

 

 

 

2396.0

2012-13

 

 

 

 

2398.0

2013-14

 

 

 

 

2437.0

2014-15

 

 

 

 

2422.0

2015-16

 

 

 

 

2479.0

2016-17

 

 

 

 

2514.3

Year

Production 000tons

Sindh

Punjab

Balochistan

KPK

Pakistan

1993-94

1954.9

1588.2

333.2

118.4

3994.7

1994-95

1406.7

1684

237.6

118.2

3446.5

1995-96

1697.2

1803

348.1

118.2

3966.5

1996-97

1961.5

1864

355.8

123.5

4304.8

1997-98

1840.9

1948

413.9

130.2

4333

1998-99

1930.3

2176

433.9

133.6

4673.8

1999-00

2123

2481

422.4

129.2

5155.6

2000-01

1682.3

2577

412.1

131.2

4802.6

2001-02

1159.1

2266

335.2

121.7

3882

2002-03

1299.7

2579.7

467.4

131.7

4478.5

2003-04

1432.8

2871.4

412.6

130.8

4847.6

2004-05

1499.7

2980.3

421.6

123.2

5024.8

2005-06

1721

3179.6

529.1

117.5

5547.2

2006-07

1761.8

3075.5

478.2

122.9

5438.4

2007-08

1817.7

3286

331.4

128.3

5563.4

2008-09

2537.1

3643

643.7

128.2

6952

2009-10

2422.3

3713

645

102.4

6882.7

2010-11

1230.3

3384

130.6

78.4

4823.3

2011-12

 

 

 

 

6160.0

2012-13

 

 

 

 

5536.0

2013-14

 

 

 

 

6798.0

2014-15

 

 

 

 

7003.0

2015-16

 

 

 

 

6811.0

2016-17

 

 

 

 

6849.0

The mega China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) has enabled Pakistan to export hybrid rice for the first time ever. The statement aforementioned is a proof that the Chinese cooperation has expanded to other sector and is increasing in the agriculture sector. The initial shipment consisting 50 to 100 metric tonnes of seeds locally developed with China’s assistance would be exported to Philippines. According to an official the environment for production of these seeds is even better in Pakistan’s Golarchi area than China.
GOLARCHI: Cooperation between Pakistan and China under China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) enabled Pakistan to export hybrid rice seeds for the first time in the country’s agricultural history, indicating that the cooperation between the two countries was expanding to other sectors, including agriculture.

The initial shipment, consisting of 50 to 100 metric tonnes of seeds locally developed with technical assistance from China, would be exported to Philippines, said Guard Agricultural Research and Services senior executive Shahrukh Malik. He was speaking to journalists during a visit to the rice fields in Golarchi, 177 km from the port city of Karachi.

“The country is all set to export seeds to Vietnam and India as well”, Malik said adding that “the climate in which hybrid rice seeds are bred in Sindh is similar to that of Philippines”. “The environment in Pakistan’s Golarchi area is even better than that of China for hybrid rice”, said Chai, one of the Chinese agriculturists working on the project, adding that the transfer of technology in the agriculture sector would not only enable Pakistan to increase its per acre production but to make it a base for the supply of hybrid rice to other parts of the region.

Guard Agricultural Research and Services and Chinese organization Longping had been working in collaboration to produce hybrid rice in the country. Longping was founded by Yuan Longping widely known as China’s ‘father of hybrid rice’. Yuan, who developed the world’s first hybrid rice in 1974, has also set three world records in hybrid rice yield in 1999, 2005 and 2011.

Hybrid rice is produced by crossbreeding different kinds of rice. Yuan’s team had been working in around 42 hybrid rice test fields in 16 provincial regions across China, including Yunnan, Sichuan, Shaanxi, Guangdong, Chongqing and Hunan since the beginning of the year.

The varieties of rice being produced in Pakistan are known best for their moisture and heat tolerance qualities and high yields. “At least 44 companies are importing hybrid seeds but none of them is producing hybrid seeds in Pakistan, which is an obstacle in the transfer of technology to the country”, Malik observed adding Philippines needs the seeds for 2018 crop owing to which the production area had been increased to 900 acres to meet the growing demand.

Malik was confident that Pakistan would soon achieve $2 billion rice export mark. “In the past, talk of $1 billion rice export target was considered a joke but now it is a reality. We have the potential to export more rice with the increasing production of hybrid rice”, he added.

The increasing production had also been changing the life style of local farmers’ community and of those who indirectly depend on farming in the area. Introduction of the hybrid rice in the area of Golarchi also widely impacted the output to a large extent. “About ten years ago, our production was not more than 50-60 maund per acre but now it has gone up to 90-110 maund per acre”, said Muhammad Iqbal, a local farmer.

Better yield has not only increased living standard of local population but has also increased the school enrolment, though in private school. “We are sending our children to the private schools so that they could get better education”, Iqbal added.

The land which according to locals was burden for farmers due to low yield has now turned into “gold mine”, as the prices have also gone up by manifold. Meantime many rice mills have popped up, increasing from 10 to around 100 since 1999. In Golarchi hybrid rice is sown at around 45000 acre of land while in Badin it cover area of 200,000 acres, resulting over 92 percent of crop consists of only hybrid rice. “Those who were barefooted and now afford motorcycles and those with motorcycles can now avail four wheel vehicles”, a farmer commented on the level of development the residents have experienced.

Unwanted plants in crop commonly called weeds reduces the yield and the quality of a harvest. It also increases production costs. In the case of paddy, the yield drops by 15-20% and sometimes even 50%.

A harvest that is heavily infested with weeds usually fails in its entirety. Every year there is a huge loss of rice, while the quality of the products from the weed-infected fields is also inferior. These also hamper the harvest.

Weed Competition: Weeds compete with desirable plants. The contest designates a relationship between the same or different species that leads to the blossoming of one at the expense of the other or at the expense of both.

While weed control with rice does not normally lead to the death of one of the two species, this results in almost reduced yields. Weeds are known, but the extent of the problem they represent is not recognized. Farmers recognize the problem in their fields, but the high labor costs for hand washing prevent proper reaction.

The competition between weeds and rice depends on the following influences:

  1. Relative growth stages of rice and weeds.
  2. Type of orientation (transplant versus direct sowing).

iii. Density of the planting.

  1. Rice variety.
  2. Moisture and nutrient availability.

In irrigated systems, rice seedlings are transplanted in puddle soil. This gives rice a significant lead over weeds and initially the contest is minimal. The competition is increasing as growth continues, especially in direct sowing, as weeds germinate at the same time and compete with the reed seedlings for light and nutrients. Weed competition generally has three forms:

Competition for light: weeds, which during the growth period are shorter than Reisernte, compete a little or not with rice for light. However, weeds that are larger can reduce the light available for rice by up to 50 percent. Since sunlight is the main source of energy used by plants for the production of foodstuffs, the shading of high weeds can stagnate growth and reduce yields.

Competition for water: where there is abundant water, the competition between rice and weeds is minimal, but in the case of scarcity, the situation is quite different. When weeds consume a considerable portion of the water, tillering, flowering and grain filling are delayed or hindered.

Competition for nutrients: weeds have a high need for nutrients. They are large feeders and, if left unchecked, can absorb more nutrients than the crop. Fertility increases, although fertilization is generally associated with an increase in weeds, which can result in greater yield reduction.

Reduction of cereal quality: Weed seeds in cereals lower the price. Weed seeds in cereals can also result in uneven moisture in the grain resulting in quality losses due to the formation of mold and / or cracking during milling.

In addition to competition with rice for sunlight, water and nutrients, weeds pose another problem. Many weed species function as alternative hosts to insect pests and disease-causing organisms, and their presence under crops or along ramparts and peripheries can result in losses due to insect or disease attacks increase.

Why are some weeds successful?

Weeds become successful because of their properties, which give them the ability to:

  1. Put in seeds before the harvest is ripe.
  2. Produce large quantities of seeds (for example, Cyperus difformis can put 100,000 seeds per plant).

iii. Seeds survive in the soil.

  1. Vegetative proliferation, which promotes their proliferation and makes them difficult to control.
  2. Imitating the harvest (eg red rice – which can not be distinguished from the harvest in early stages, but sets seeds and then breaks down before the harvest is harvested).
  3. Grow vigorously, allowing them to exceed the harvest.

Integrated weed management: Integrated weed management uses a combination of different agronomic methods to control weeds, reducing dependence on a weed control method.

Reducing dependence on one or two specific weed control techniques means that these techniques or tools will be effective for future use. The goal of integrated weed management is to keep the weed densities at manageable levels and at the same time to prevent the populations from shifting into difficult-to-control populations. Weeds caused by weeds are minimized without reducing agricultural income.

Controlling with one or two techniques gives the weeds a chance to adapt to these practices. For example, the use of herbicides with the same mode of action has led to weeds that are resistant to these herbicides year after year.

Integrated management uses a variety of techniques to get weeds out of balance. Weeds are less able to adapt to a constantly changing system that uses many different control practices, as opposed to a program that needs one or two control tools. Integrated weed management practices in rice include:

Soil preparation: Thorough soil preparation can significantly reduce the incidence of weeds in rice by destroying all weeds and weeds in order to provide weed free conditions at the time of planting and to provide a good environment for rapid growth of reed seedlings.

Water Management: Many weeds can not germinate or grow in flooded soils, which makes water management a very effective tool for controlling grasses and sedges.

Once the transplanted seedlings have established (approximately one week after the transplant), they completely flood the plot to a depth of 3 to 4 inches to inhibit weed growth. When the rice grows, gradually increase the depth to 6 “. The soil must be completely and continuously submerged if the flooding is to take effect.

Hand-weeding: hand-weeding is time-consuming and lengthy. When weeds are large enough to be grasped, they are pulled out of the ground and discarded. Smaller weeds can be pulled by hand. Early hand weeding is better, since any delay can absorb the weed absorbing nutrients.

A common mistake is that small weeds do not affect the rice, but they certainly do it, as a simple jentemonstration will show.

Hand Chopping: Hand chopping is used as a method of weed control, especially during planting. Hand chopping is faster than hand washing and works well against creeping perennials.

Fruit Seed: Since each plant has its own characteristic weed, the continued cultivation of the same fruit in an action can build up these weeds. The rotation of rice with kharif cultures can lead to a reduced incidence of water-incompatible weeds in the following crops.

Fruit Seed with Allelopathic Cultures and Reiskulturen: Some crops such as sorghum, pearl millet and maize can drastically suppress the weed population and reduce their biomass. Bearded millet may have a rest herb suppression in the following crop. The inclusion of these fodder plants prior to rice harvesting in a rice-wheat rotation can provide a satisfactory control of the weeds and minimize the use of herbicides. It is obviously necessary to evaluate whether these crops can be successfully grown.

Herbicides: The importance of using herbicides is closely linked to labor costs and availability. Herbicides are one of the first labor-saving technologies that must be adopted when labor costs rise. As a result, the use of herbicides varies widely across countries. Herbicides replace weeding by hand and allow direct sowing instead of a transplantation that is less labor intensive.

The direct sowing is linked to the use of herbicides, since without its use the weeds in the stadiums in which the fields can be flooded grow so fast that manual control possibilities are often not possible.

Herbicides are also used in the transplanted systems. The costs associated with the use of herbicides should continue to be a major constraint on their widespread use. Herbicides can be classified as nonselective or selective and before and after emergence.

Most herbicides used in rice production are selective and control some or most of the weeds while they have a limited effect on the culture. The selectivity does not necessarily depend on the connections, but also on the speeds, timing, and application procedures, and therefore it is important to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations.[social_warfare]

Non-selective herbicides such as glyphosate are sometimes used prior to the establishment of rice in weed infestations such as wild rice, which is difficult to control with selective herbicides.

Pre-emergence herbicides are applied to the soil and combated weeds before they arise while they are applied after emergence onto weeds after they have been formed. The amide groups include the herbicides butachlor, pretilachlor and propanil. Butachlor can be used either in the pre-emergence or early after emergence to allow control over a wide range of one-year-old grasses and some broad-leaved weeds.

The Ministry of Commerce (MoC) has constituted 35 committees across the country to promote the agricultural sector which was neglected in past to save the country from food security. The committees would boost regional trade and monitor agriculture import and exports trade patterns, including import pricing, and highlight issues and give recommendations in regard to trade facilitation for agriculture products.
PrintThe committees would discuss and suggest recommendations to resolve problems confronted by growers, exporters and suppliers and other related issues. The regional trade committees would submit their reports and recommendations to the concerned ministries directly. The representatives of ministries or departments would be member of regional trade committees. The ministries and departments include Ministry of National Food and Security and Research Division, Ministry of Science and Technology, Trade Development Authority of Pakistan, National Tariff Commission of Pakistan, Punjab, Sindh, agriculture departments, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan Agriculture, Livestock and Co-operative departments, Pakistan Standards and Quality Control Authority, Pakistan National Accreditation Council, NAPHIS, Department of Plant Protection and Department of Animal Quarantine. The representatives of chambers, farmers associations, mango & citrus association, Rice Exporters Association and other bodies would also be member of the committees. The chairmen of Islamabad Poultry and Vegetable Farmers Association, Faisalabad, Pakistan Agriculture and Dairy Farmers Association, Lahore, Pakistan Dairy Association, Lahore, Pakistan Rice Exporters Association, Pakistan Sugar Mills Association, Multan Mango Growers Association, All Pakistan Fruits and Vegetable Exporters, Importers and Merchants Association, Karachi, Pakistan Fruits Processors Association, Islamabad, Pakistan Flour Mills Association, Lahore, All Pakistan Crop Protection Association, Lahore, Seed Association of Pakistan, Sindh Badger Board, Hyderabad would be included in the committees.

Source: Business Recorder

Noticing the falling yield of rice in Pakistan the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) representative has urged the Pakistani rice farmers to adopt the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) prepared by the World Bank Institute (WBI) and widely practiced in several rice growing countries successfully for achieving higher productivity and water savings.Rice farmers advised to adopt SRI tech for higher yield-Agriculture Information Bank(agrinfobank.com)
In a statement Zulfikar Thaver member UNGC lauded the efforts of the WBI for preparing and promoting the SRI and said that the SRI is a guide for rice farmers and teaches them rice planting and water management for increase in yield and income. It is based on six key elements and educates the rice farmers in land preparation, seedlings preparation, innovative transplanting, intermittent irrigation, rotary weeding and organic fertilisation.
He said it is a marvelous system which can give remarkable improvement in yield per acre and lowers cost of production scientifically.
After studying the SRI one realises the need to adopt the system without loss of time. It is pertinent to note that no heavy farm machinery is required as it is very simple and its application is based on methods and techniques and simple devices are used in plantation after land preparation and intermittent irrigation under single plantation techniques.
He urged the ministry of agriculture to immediately contact the WBI and plan to introduce the SRI for the next cultivation for all varieties of rice in all the provinces for best results.
 

News Source                            News Collated by agrinfobank.com Team

Courtesy The Nation

By VERONICA PULUMBARIT

When I first saw brown rice as a child, I was told, “Huwag yan, maruming bigas yan.”
Well it turns out not all rice are created equal, with brown rice seeming to have the upper hand. Brown rice is, in fact, not dirty. It is a healthy choice being rich in B vitamins and potent antioxidants that fight cancer.
During the Brown Rice Campaign bloggers night at Sev’s Café in Manila on Tuesday, Jed Alegado of anti-poverty organization Oxfam said the “dirty-looking” feature of brown rice is actually the healthy “bran,” the hard outer layers of the rice grains.
Alegado explained that the Philippines has had brown rice since the 1950s but it has largely been edged out in popularity by white rice, which is generally considered “classy” and of better quality.Rice: Why 'dirty' brown is better
Oxfam International, together with the non-government organization Dakila, ,launched “The Good Food Project” to promote brown rice this year which is the National Year of Rice.
The Good Food Project cites several reasons for promoting brown rice:
(1)  Good for one’s health – Citing medical experts and nutritionists, the Good Food Project said brown rice is rich in dietary fiber needed to fight diabetes. It is also high in phytic acids that combat cancer and proteins that prevent cardiovascular diseases.
(2)  Good for the environment – Brown rice requires only one milling process unlike white rice which needs two. This means that brown rice requires lesser fuel use. The Good Food Project also noted that the organic means of producing brown rice eliminates the use of insecticides and pesticides.
(3)  Good for the farmers – The Good Food Project said an increase in demand for brown rice will open economic opportunities for farmers. The cost of producing brown rice is also much smaller compared to white rice.
(4)  Good for the country – According to Oxfam, if more Filipinos will shift to brown rice, the country’s problem about over-importation of rice can be solved. Oxfam said the milling recovery of brown rice is 10 percent higher than white rice. This means that if you will mill the same quantities of brown and white rice, you will get 10 percent more sacks of rice from brown rice compared to white rice.
Higher price
While brown rice is seen as “dirty”, it is actually a little more expensive than white rice. While white rice generally sells for P30 per kilo and up, brown rice sells as much as P55 to P90 per kilo.
According to a flyer distributed by the brown rice advocates that night, only two independent distributors sold brown rice at only P40 per kilo: AG Agro-Eco Ventures and PARAGOS-Pilipinas.
The Good Food Project also noted the prices of some organic rice brands sold in supermarkets or groceries:
· Prime Organics P130 (two kilos)
· Jordan Farms P70 (800 grams)
· Farms and Cottages P157.50 (two kilos)
The other Metro Manila organic brown rice distributors cited by The Good Food Project included:
· RR Trade (P55 per kilo)
· Bios Dynamis (P90 per kilo)
· GLOWCORP
· Pecuaria
In an interview with GMA News Online, Atty. Ipat Luna, owner of Sev’s Café and a brown rice advocate, said the way to lower the price of brown rice is to encourage more people to shift from white to brown rice.
“Kailangan dumami tayong kumakain ng brown rice. Kahit man lang gradual o kung gusto ng tao, isang araw isang linggo magsimula, o kaya haluan yung kanilang white rice ng brown,” said Luna (Disclosure: Luna is married to Howie Severino, editor-in-chief of GMA News Online).
The Good Food Project is promoting the transition to brown rice through the hashtags #brb and #BrownRiceBiyernes.
The group is encouraging people to transition to brown rice by consuming it once a week – every Friday.
“Pag hindi tayo dumami [brown rice consumers] novelty item pa rin yan. Kaya mataas pa rin ang presyo. Pero napansin ko, bumababa na siya. Makakahanap ka na ng P45 at P50 pesos sa groceries. Hindi nga lang siya organic pero it’s still better than white rice,” Luna said.
Start early
Luna also encouraged parents to start their children on brown rice at a young age.
“Pag nasanay sila sa brown kahit later on magustuhan nila yung white, it just becomes a choice pero sanay sila sa brown,” Luna stated.
As for the popularity of white over brown rice, Luna said it was generational matter. “Yung nanay ko, ayaw na ayaw niya yung brown kasi yun yung panahon ng Hapon, yun ang palay nung gyera, yung bigas na di mamill dahil na kakainin mo na lang kahit brown. Feeling mo taghirap. May notion siyang ganun.”
However, she noted that brown rice is now seen by many as the “sosyal rice” especially as the food trend right now is toward healthier and organic options.
She noted that many restaurants are offering only brown rice, including her own café. “We want people to get used to it as a rice, as a regular part of their diet.”
Luna explained that eating too much rice in general is not healthy. With brown rice, people tend to consume less rice as it is more filling.
On cooking brown rice to perfection, Luna suggests soaking the rice in water for 30 minutes to an hour before cooking in a rice cooker. — DVM, GMA News

Source: http://www.gmanetwork.com